< A fairly prominent constellation of the southern sky in the shape of an inverted cross, below the bright Fomalhaut of the Southern Fish. With a little imagination in the distribution of the stars, we can see a flying crane with its legs spread back, neck stretched out and head held high. Only the northernmost part is visible in our evening sky. For observers with smaller binoculars, apart from a few binaries, the constellation is poor in objects, although for instruments with binoculars with a lens diameter of around 200 mm it has some nice extragalactic objects. In the northeastern part of the constellation, north of the star θ Gruis, there is a small group of 10th to 11th magnitude galaxies, most of which are spiral galaxies: NGC 7410 , 7424, 7552 and 7590.

PN
☀11.0mag
Ø 2.2'

IC 5150

See IC 5148 .

300/350mm - 13.1" (8/17/85): fairly faint with OIII at 79x, fairly large. Appears clearly annular with averted vision. The central hole is possibly elongated N-S. A mag 11 star is off the south edge. Similar view on 7/20/85.

400/500mm - 17.5" (10/30/99): Even at -39° declination, this moderately large planetary is a beautiful annular ring at 100x with an OIII filter. Appears round, ~100" diameter, the annulus has an irregular surface brightness. The central "hole" is perhaps 25" in diameter and fairly dark. A mag 10.5 star is close off the SSW edge.

17.5" (8/20/88): perfect annular 2' ring visible at 82x using an OIII filter. A mag 10.5 star is just off the SSW edge 1.8' from the center. The ring-shape is clearly visible with direct vision.

17.5" (7/22/87): beautiful ring at 140x with an OIII filter. Appears fairly large, fairly bright with a mag 11 star off the south edge.

900/1200mm - 48" (10/23/14): beautiful, large annular planetary at 375x, round, roughly 2' diameter, with a relatively thick annulus and a 30" central dark hole. Contains a very easy central star, which seems brighter than mag 16.5. The annulus is mottled and irregular in brightness. A 60° arc along the NW portion of the annulus is slightly brighter and a 90° arc from SE to NE is much brighter and a little thicker. A mag 10.5 star is off the SSW side (1.9' from center), but there are no superimposed stars.

Notes by Steve Gottlieb

GX
☀12.0mag
Ø 2.6' / 60''

NGC 7232

Drawing Uwe Glahn

John Herschel discovered NGC 7232 = h3931, along with NGC 7233 , on 6 Sep 1834 and recorded "pB; vS; pmE; psbM; 15" l, 8" br. The preceding of 2."

300/350mm - 13.1" (8/17/85): faint, elongated WNW-ESE, brighter core. Located just 3.0' SW of mag 8.5 SAO 231056 and 3.0' W of a mag 9.5 star. Brighter IC 5181 lies 26' SW. Very far south for viewing from the latitude of Northern California.

400/500mm - 18" (7/5/05 - Magellan Observatory, Australia): moderately bright, moderately large, elongated 5:2 ~E-W, ~1.5'x0.6'. Well concentrated with a bright 30" core. Forms the western vertex of an isosceles triangle with two bright stars – mag 8.8 HD 211111 3' NE and mag 8.9 HD 211121 3.5' E. To complete this striking arrangement, a fainter companion, NGC 7233 is 1.9' E and is squeezed between NGC 7232 and the mag 8.9 star nearly due east. Observation made with a partially dewed secondary that probably dimmed both members.

Notes by Steve Gottlieb

GX
☀13.4mag
Ø 66'' / 48''

NGC 7249

Drawing Uwe Glahn

John Herschel discovered NGC 7249 = h3933 on 4 Oct 1834 and recorded "eeF; R; rather a doubtful object." Despite his doubts, his position is within 1' of ESO 190-001 = PGC 68606, the brightest member of AGC 3869.

600/800mm - 25" (10/10/15 - OzSky): at 318x; fairly faint, fairly small, round, 0.4' diameter, weak concentration. Forms a pair with PGC 95403 = 2MASX J22204571-5506093, just 2.5' NE. The companion was logged as very faint, small, 15" diameter. A mag 15.5-15.8 star is 0.4' NE. These are the two brightest members of the southern cluster AGC 3869.

Notes by Steve Gottlieb

GX
☀11.4mag
Ø 3.8' / 2.8'

NGC 7412

Drawing Uwe Glahn

John Herschel discovered NGC 7412 = h3961 on 2 Sep 1836 and recorded "eF; vL; 3' diam at least; it is south-preceding a star 7m, 8' dist."

Based on a photo taken at the Helwan observatory in 1919-20, it was described as a "2-branched spiral with pF almost stellar nucleus and condensations; like the letter "S"."

300/350mm - 13.1" (9/3/86): faint, fairly large, very diffuse, elongated ~N-S. Located 6' SSW of mag 7.3 SAO 231361.

Notes by Steve Gottlieb

GX
☀11.4mag
Ø 3.3' / 3.1'

NGC 7496

Drawing Uwe Glahn

John Herschel discovered NGC 7496 = h3973 on 5 Sep 1834 and recorded "B; L; lE; vgmbM; to a * 13m."

400/500mm - 17.5" (10/20/90): faint, fairly small, oval 3:2 NNW-SSE, brighter core. A mag 10.5 star is off the north end 1.8' from center! Located 32' W of mag 4.3 Theta Gruis (V = 4.3).

Notes by Steve Gottlieb

GX
☀10.3mag
Ø 5.2' / 96''

NGC 7410

Drawing Bertrand Laville

James Dunlop discovered NGC 7410 = D 518 = h3960 on 14 July 1826 and recorded "a very faint nebula extended preceding and following, about 1.5' long and 20 or 25 arcseconds broad; a little brighter in the middle, or rather nearer the N.p. extremity; the S.f. extremity is very ill defined." His position is 11' due east of the galaxy. John Herschel first observed this galaxy on 4 Sep 1834 and logged "B, pL, vmE in pos 41.9 degrees, pgmbM, 3' long, 20" broad, has a star 11m, 2' dist, pos from nucleus 12.9°." On a later sweep he wrote "a long pB ray, 4' long, psvmbM, elongated in pos 44.7°." His mean position is accurate.

200/250mm - 8" (7/16/82): faint, moderately large, very elongated SW-NE.

400/500mm - 17.5" (10/20/90): fairly bright, fairly large, elongated 3:1 SW-NE, well concentrated to a small very bright core, stellar nucleus. A mag 12 star is 1.8' NNE of center. Appears bright for such a far southern galaxy (observed from +38° latitude).

Notes by Steve Gottlieb

GX
☀11.4mag
Ø 4.3' / 48''

NGC 7462

Drawing Bertrand Laville

John Herschel discovered NGC 7462 = h3968 on 5 Sep 1834 and recorded "pB; S; vmE; has a *11m preceding its extremity." The mag 11 star at the west edge is MCG -07-47-012 (misclassified as a galaxy).

300/350mm - 13.1" (9/3/86): fairly faint, fairly small, pretty edge-on oriented ~E-W. A mag 11 star is at the west end and four other comparable stars including a nice double at 36" separation are within 5'. Located 10.6' W of mag 6.6 SAO 231415.

Notes by Steve Gottlieb

GX
☀10.6mag
Ø 3.4' / 2.7'

NGC 7552

Drawing Bertrand Laville

300/350mm - 13.1" (11/5/83): fairly faint, small, elongated E-W, small bright nucleus. A mag 10 star lies 4.4' W and a mag 11 star is off the south side. The Grus trio consisting of NGC 7582 , NGC 7590 and NGC 7599 are roughly 35' NE with the entire group called the Grus Quartet.

600/800mm - 30" (10/21/17 - OzSky): at 264x; very bright, very large, elongated 5:2 E-W, ~2.3'x0.9'. A brighter bar extends E-W along the major axis. The center is punctuated by a sharp, extremely bright stellar nucleus! A spiral arm was clearly visible attached at the east end of the major axis (bar). The beginning of the arm rotated counterclockwise towards the south but it shortly dimmed out after a distance ~0.6'. The main part of the galaxy is embedded in an extremely low surface brightness halo, ~3' in diameter. A mag 13.5 star is off the west end [2.2' from center] and a mag 12 star is at the edge of the outer halo [1.8' S of center]. NGC 7583 , the first in the Grus Trio with 7590 and 7599, lies 28' ENE.

Notes by Steve Gottlieb

GX
☀12.5mag
Ø 1.8' / 48''

IC 5170

Drawing Bertrand Laville
TypeGX [SBa]
descrTwo entries for IC 5170 in ESO and ESO-LV.
RA22:12:29.6
Dec-47:13:17.0
major_axis 1.8'
minor_axis 48.0''
positon_angle26.0
mag12.5
surface_bright12.6